Boston Marathon Training 2016

Boston Marathon Training – Week 1

The Boston Marathon is Monday April 18th 2016. After 2 years of not being able to run (2014 – miscarriage just prior, 2015 – pregnant) I’m super pumped to be beginning my 22 week training cycle for Boston which includes a 16 weeks real marathon training with a 6 week build up … This begins 10 weeks postpartum and ends when APA is 7.5 months old. Lets get this party started!

Boston Marathon Training 2016

Week 1 of the 6 week build up:

  • 11/16 Monday 
    • Walking Hill workout.  3 miles + HIIT training 25 mins
  • 11/17 Tuesday 
    • OrangeTheory! Class included 3 miles of moderate to fast paced running, 600m rowing TRX and Weights.  
  • 11/18 Wednesday 
    • Training session with my FAB trainer Paul.  60 mins
  • 11/19 Thursday
    • 1.5 mile warm up, 8 x 1/4 mile at half marathon pace (used 8:25-8:05) , 1 min walk in between 1 mile warm down.  Total 5 miles
  • 11/20 Friday
    • OFF
  • 11/21 Saturday
    • 5.5 Miles steady state pace including some hills
  • 11/22 Sunday
    • Walked, but mostly an OFF day b/c of a head cold.

For the most part I am happy with the week. OrangeTheory taught me a valuable lesson in speed. I’ve been a little afraid to push my speed postpartum … not because I dont feel well, but rather becuase I am doubting my abiity to run fast. I pushed 7:30 and lower for my pace during OrangeTheory and although it was for a short amount of time, I felt good!!

Training and keeping up with the strength portion of my fitness is my downfall. I’d rather just run … but I learned last pregnancy that my body needs to rebuild muscle especially around the core. I know, duh! but I neglected it last time until almost 6 months post partum when I wasnt seeing results I wanted to. This time I am starting the road back with an ample amount of strength training and I already feel strong.

Next week my long run ramps up to 7-8 miles … and I am very nervous already. I always get a bit of anxiety about long runs. Will my stomach cooperate? Will I get lost? Can I actually run straight for an hour right now?! Its amazing to me how I used to run 18-20 miles no problem and now an hour of running seems like a lot.

Its going to be a long road back … but I am determined and actually excited to push myself.

Who else is training for Boston or any other Spring marathon?!

APA Birth Story

APA’s Birth Story – Part 1 (The Good)

APA Birth Story

My little man is almost 10 weeks old … and honestly I am just getting brave enough to relive his birth.  It was a beautiful and easy experience until it wasn’t, and then it got bad.  The result is an amazing little boy and I am so grateful, but there were moments when I was as scared as I’ve ever been for myself and my health.   I’m going to break it down into 2 parts, the good and the ugly.  

Here is the good … 

APA came into the world at 37 weeks, 5 days old. 

Short Story, my water broke and I had a C Section resulting in this guy:

6lbs 11oz 19.75 inches of sweetness.

The long story is much longer, so stick with me on this one.

In the week preceding APA’s arrival I was a beast. I was uncomfortable to a level that made me tear up constantly. I was having contractions that would take my breath away and harden my entire belly. On September 3rd I knew that it wasn’t going to be much longer. Sure enough I woke up on at 3am on Sept 4th with a leak. It was a little one, but absolutely out of the norm. I’ll be honest, at that moment I was really tired and I decided that I would lie back down and see if anything else happened.  I was hoping to have a VBAC and was waiting for progress to go to the hospital. 

I woke again at 7:30am and sure enough there was a little more “leaking” … I finally sprung into action, knowing that I shouldn’t wait too long before calling the doc if my water was broken.  I showered, I got my things together and I alerted VC that this was happening. I called my mom, who was coming to the hospital with us.  I also called the twin’s caregiver and asked her to head to our house and consulted my OB BFF Meggie. Doing all of these things, I almost forgot to call the doctor! I finally called them and they said to meet at Mt Sinai Maternity as soon as possible.

When my mom and our caregiver arrived I was frantically making breakfast for the twins, getting my things together … and waiting for VC.  Funny story.  G1 had an eye allergy that was bothering her and VC ran to CVS to get some drops as we were waiting for everyone to arrive.  I think that he didnt see the urgency in heading to the hospital, as I wasnt actively laboring badly so he stopped to get himself breakfast and a coffee.  30 mins later he wandered in coffee in hand!  I’m laughing about his laissez faire attitude now, but in the moment I was just a tad edgy! 

We were on the road to the city by 9:30am and checked into the hospital by 10:15. It was a really quiet day on the maternity floor … note to self have a baby the Friday before a holiday weekend.

Once checked it was confirmed that my water had broken and I was consistently contracting however I wasn’t dilated at all. Being that I am Group B Strep Positive I had a decision to make. I could either induce with piotcin or have a C Section. Inducing was not the doctor’s first choice because of the strain it may put on the baby and me.  I was hoping to VBAC, but I knew that a C-Section was possible being that I had one with the twins and I went into the birth knowing that either one could occur my decision to go with the C-Section was mainly for the health of the baby. The induction would have been hard on him, especially given that my water levels were low. It wasn’t a hard decision for me, as I knew that I could trust my doctors.

I mentioned earlier that I spoke to Meggie about what was happening in the morning.  That was invaluable, she walked me through exactly what my options were going to be when I got to the hospital.  That gave me time to think on them during the drive over and have my mind settled when I arrived.  It was way better than making a spur of the moment decision.  Thank you Meggie!!

Given that I hadn’t eaten since dinner the night before we were able to schedule the C-Section immediately.  I had an OR time of 1pm and we waited for nothing more than an hour before I was walking into the OR. This experience was so incredibly different than my emergency C Section with the twins, I was walking into the same OR that I had been rolled into at full speed 5 years ago. (The G’s Birth Story) The events leading up to the C-Section were so calm, and the surgery was methodical and organized.  Most of all I was actually really calm.

They placed the spinal anesthetic and let the numbness take over.  The process of a spinal was uncomfortable, but not overly painful for me … the hardest part is hunching over your large belly.  I also was very nervous that I wasn’t going to be numb enough, but the anesthesiologist talked me through the numbness taking over and assured me that I wouldn’t feel any pain.

The curtain was placed and VC was allowed into the room (again totally different than before, he wasn’t allowed in the room for the G’s birth) he sat next to my head and held my hand as the section began. I had been warned that I would not feel pain, but that I would feel the tugging and pulling of the surgery and that was 100% true. It was really weird. Not in a painful way but in an OMG there are hands in my abdomen kinda way … It was about 15 mins and suddenly there was a huge push on my belly, a massive sense of relief and a cry. Asher was in our world.

APA Birth

They brought him to me for a second and then took him to clean up and clear out some fluids that were in his mouth and nose. The entire OR immediately said “he looks just like his dad”. I hadn’t gotten a good look so I was craning my neck trying to catch a glimpse while VC was snapping photos of him. Finally they brought him to me in a little bundle and placed him on my chest.

APA Birth 2

There is nothing quite like the sensation of having a warm tiny human emerge from your body and then cuddle up next to you moments later. I didn’t have that with my previous birth. The Gs were whisked away to the NICU while I was still under general anesthesia and I didn’t see them for over 24 hours later. FYI – this method is much much better.

The process of closing me up took a lot longer than I thought it would. I guess I am happy about that, the doctors were diligent and my scar is perfectly in line with my previous one. At some point they took APA away and weighed him, cleaned him some more and placed him in his bed. I was amazed at how calm he was. He let out a little cry when he came out, but other than that had been quiet through the cleaning and weighing and now was sleeping in his little bed.

APA Apgar

We finally made it into the recovery room with APA by our side and the nurse asked if I would like to feed him. Nervous, I took him and placed him onto me. He immediately latched and started to eat.  Again, this was 100% different than the twins who were too tiny to latch when born, and never really did. It was in that moment that I felt connected to this boy.

APA Mama

I knew him in my belly and I felt his heartbeat when he was first delivered, but skin to skin connectivity made my heart leap. He was really here, in our lives.  We were now a family of 5.  

family of 5


To be continued … 

APA part 2

APA’s Birth Story – part 2 (it got ugly)

APA’s birth and delivery via C-Section was pretty seamless. Honestly I feel like I waltzed into the hospital, chilled for a bit with my husband and had a C-Section. (part 1 of the story here)

However the aftermath was not quite so pretty.

APA part 2

For 24 hours after APA’s birth I was great. I had a bunch of visitors come to the hospital, I was up walking and talking and eating and basically on cloud 9.

G1 Hospital Visit

 The next day (day 2 postpartum) was not so good, I felt blurry and tired. My mind wasn’t able to hold a good conversation and my pain level was pretty high. That night at 10pm I began shaking uncontrollably.  It just so happened that I was alone in my room at that moment, VC had stepped out and my mom had gone home.  I buzzed the nurse and could barely get out the words “I cant stop shaking” … I dont think they heard the urgency in my voice and I had been 100% healthy leading up to this, so it took a good amount of time and a few more buzzes for anyone to come to my room.  When they finally did they found me with a 104 degree fever, freezing cold and seizing.  

This went on for about an hour at a time and for the next 2 and a half days.  

I had contracted an infection in my uterus during the surgery and the process of fighting the infection off was really hard for my body.  I continued to spike fevers of 103-104 and have periods of seizing. During these periods I couldn’t control my body, my muscles would tense up causing intense pain because my abdomen had just been sewn shut. I was also freezing cold, and shaking but sweating buckets.

There were a few really low points, one in particular when there were no less than 4 nurses and a doctor surrounding me.  They were trying to get me warm, and had to test for sepsis in my blood. The process is a lot of needles and blood draws.  During the draws there were multiple people trying to hold my body still and keep me from shaking.  Another less than awesome moment was when my IV came loose from being bumped around and they had to reissue the IV in a different spot.  The nurse tried so many times because I couldn’t control my body to be still enough for her to find a vein.  No bueno.  

I’ll be honest, it was the most scared I have ever been for myself. I am typically very calm and controlled, I have a high tolerance for pain and roll with what happens … but this. I could see the fear in my husband’s eyes, I could see the high level of concern with which the doctors and nurses were treating me, I could feel the tension. Each time my fever would spike or my blood pressure would be frighteningly low I would worry more and look at this little infant next to me that I could barely take care of.

VC was incredible during this time, he would help me pump milk and would feed APA with a bottle. He took over all things baby and meanwhile layered me with blankets and broke little bit of crackers for me to choke down.

papa and APA

Finally the fevers subsided but the antibiotic and pain killer combination was so strong that I had been vomiting every thing I put in my mouth.  It took another 2 days and IV infusions for that to stop.  On day 5 I was able to walk around again, keep liquids down and eat small amounts of mushy food. I really think this only happened because I requested to stop all pain killers, they were too tough on my stomach and I would rather deal with the pain than the constant vomiting.   It was also determined that I would not be able to handle oral antibiotics, so I needed to be fever free and off the IV infusions for 48 hours before I could be released from the hospital.  


When I was released I knew I wasn’t 100%. However I wanted out of the hospital, I wanted to be home where I could sleep without people poking and prodding me and in my warm comfy bed.  For the next 2 weeks I was in constant fear of another fever spike. I was completely worn down.  For the first week I was able to stay awake during APA’s feedings only, but slept every other moment.  The second week I started to be awake a little more and have more energy to walk around but I was so swollen from all of the fluids. I could barely bend my knees and my breath was labored from swelling in my abdomen.  I was a mess.  

I really have to thank my husband, my mom and our caregiver for help during this time.  I was barely a functional human being and could not have cared for myself and my baby on my own.  It truly takes a village.  

Amazingly after those 2 weeks I was functioning really well, I still had some healing to do but I didn’t have any fevers, chills and my pain level was relatively low so that I only needed to take Motrin a few times a day.

walking with APA

On this side of everything I see my beautiful baby, I feel my healing body and I am so grateful that I made it through that.  It was scary, and something I didn’t even consider as a possibility for happening.  My previous birth was also scary (The G’s Birth Story) however once the C-Section was over I had smooth sailing, I recovered fast and never had any hiccups.  I made the choice to have a C-Section rather than be induced this time with the assumption that would be the case again. I guess you just never know.  

My takeaway is this: Childbirth is a huge event for a woman’s body, and should be seen as such.  However we are blessed to have such amazing bodies that endure and heal.  Neither of my birth experiences were “normal” and there is a part of me that is sad about that, but I feel pretty strong and incredible for housing 3 children and going through some serious measures to bring them into this world.  

And to those of you reading this, I don’t tell the story to inflict fear! I promise I would do it all over again in a heartbeat … the prize at the end of the tunnel is magnificent.  But I want women to be more educated on the possibilities of what can happen during and after childbirth.  I wholeheartedly believe that there is a darkness of information on the subject and we need to share our stories to educate each other.